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2015  (Vol. 7, No: 1)*

HyeJin Jang,   Hyemee Yoon

Vol. 07 (01), 001-008


Abstract

The present study focused on the academic achievement and life satisfaction of rural adolescents in Korea deprived of human and social resources compared with their urban peers. The paper examined relative influences of variables, self-efficacy of youth, family social capital, social relations, and cultural capital of adolescents residing in the rural community of different sizes. 2,409 ninth graders residing in rural areas of eight South Korean provinces were recruited for the self-administered questionnaire. The variables concerning academic achievement of rural youths were, in order of influence, family social capital, cultural capital, and self-efficacy, while the variables relevant to life satisfaction were, also in order of influence, social relationships, family social capital, and self-efficacy. The result showed not only difference between two groups of variables, but also relative weak influence of socioeconomic status. Moreover, while academics tended to approach rural regions as a relatively homogeneous group compared to the urban counterpart, this study proved that each rural region, varying in size, were defined by own unique characteristics. The smaller the rural community was, the greater influence parental academic socialization had over academic achievement, while the influence of cultural capital was smaller. Community attachment had the greatest influence on life satisfaction of rural adolescents, while parent-child relationship, cited as a significantly influential variable by other researches, had relatively low influence. The study results suggest that the size of rural community must be considered for the programs designed to enhance academic achievement and life satisfaction of rural youths.

 

Keywords: Rural Adolescent; Academic Achievement; Life Satisfaction

Received
 Accepted
December 2014
February 2015
 

Daniel Buor

Vol. 07 (01), 009-019


Abstract

The use of the condom as a strategy to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS has assumed several dimensions, yet, in Africa, not much has been done on views expressed by suburban communities  that are the centres of multiethnic, religious and educational backgrounds. The paper probes into opinions of a suburban community in Ghana on the use of condoms as means of prevention against HIV/AIDS. It is further to determine the prospects of the efficacy of the device in stemming an upward trend of the spread of the pandemic. The qualitative approach of in-depth interviews was used as key research instrument. A sample of 60 respondents comprising male and female adults of 18 years and above, with components of basic, secondary and tertiary educational levels as well as representation of various religious groups including Catholics and Moslems who have some biases in the use of the condom, was used. A combination of simple random and purposive sampling techniques was used in selecting the sample. Key findings, among others, are that even though morality, religious dogma, stigmatisation and loss of sexual satisfaction appear to serve as obstacles to the use of the device, the mortality and associated socio-economic implications that non-use of the device engenders supersede the obstacles that hinder its use.  Another key finding is that education exhibits a positive association with the knowledge of the condom and HIV/AIDS. Recommendations to improve the use of the device have been made. Further research directions have also been recommended.

Keywords: condom; HIV/AIDS; abstinence; suburban; prevention; qualitative study

Received

   Accepted 
January 2015
   March 2015
 

Abstract

Power is associated to men and the world of men is recognized as the world of power. Friendship and cooperation are, however, connected to women and their world. In general, there has always been a state of power imbalance between men and women. Besides gender, high occupational status gives people the autonomy to exert power. Following an adopted version of Woods’ approach (1989) to status and gender and Brown and Gilman’s theory of power (1960), this qualitative study explores the factors influencing men and women’s cooperation in gender studies. We aim to find out whether power, status and friendship has any impacts on both genders’ decision making process to contribute in research activities. The data of this study is based on men and women’s confirmation or refusal to take part in research on gender studies. Findings of the study suggest that factors such as gender, power relations and occupational status of the participants determine their willingness to cooperate in studies pertaining to gender. In equal occupational status, gender of the participants creates power and affects the cooperation of the participants. Moreover, it is found that the concept of gender research itself is a determining factor in this regard.

 

Keywords: power relations, gender, friendship, cooperation, gender studies, social status, decision making.

Received
   Accepted
 January 2015
   March 2015
 
 
* Preliminary version